Youth Mental Health

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 What is good mental health?
 Mental health issues
 Depression
 Anxiety
 What is psychosis?
 Self-harm
 Helpful links for self-harm
 Eating disorders
 Helpful Links for eating disorders
 How to get help for mental health issues?
 Helpful Links for mental health support
 Mental health and the use of drugs and alcohol
 Helpful links for alcohol and other drugs
 Bullying
 Helpful links for bullying
 Are you caring for or living with someone suffering from mental illness or disability?
 Helpful links for young carers
 Children’s mental health
 Helpful links for children’s mental health

 

Are you currently struggling with emotional or mental health issues?

There is help out there.

If you feel that you are a risk to yourself or others call Emergency Services on 000

What is good mental health?

Good mental health is not about feeling good all the time – it’s about the ability to experience a range of emotions and still be able to function in life. Good mental health often means that we have the resiliency and flexibility to manage emotions in our daily lives in a variety of situations.

Mental health issues

Mental health issues are common and 1 in 4 people between the ages of 16 to 25 will experience mental health issues at some point. When your emotions are persistent for a long period of time or begin to negatively affect your life, school, work or relationships you may be suffering from a mental health issue. It is important to seek help and talk to a health professional.

Depression

It is normal to feel things such as sadness, disappointment and frustration. However, when these feelings persist for weeks or more and start to affect your day to day life, you may be feeling the effects of depression. It is important to talk to someone you trust like a parent, teacher, counsellor, or GP, that can help you find support.

Anxiety

Being worried or anxious is a normal way for our bodies to stay alert and help us respond to certain situations. When anxiety persists, especially after the event has passed or for long periods of time, and interferes with your ability to do things in your day to day life, it could be a sign of an anxiety disorder. Talks to someone you trust such as a parent, teacher, counsellor or GP for support.

Helpful links for depression/anxiety

Reach Out www.reachout.com

Youth Beyond Blue www.youthbeyondblue.com.au

Headspace 1800 367 968 www.headspace.org.au

Life Line 13 11 14

Anxiety and OCD Helpline 1300 269 438

Youth Positive Pathways http://youthpositivepathways.com.au

What is psychosis?

Psychosis is a disruption in the brain’s functioning in which the individual has a difficult time distinguishing what is real. Someone in a state of psychosis may experience hallucinations (seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling or feel something that is not there), delusions (false beliefs) or confused thinking.

If you have experienced psychosis it is vital that you speak to a health professional. First episodes of psychosis most often occur in late adolescence or in the early adult years. It can be frightening and often misunderstood, but with early intervention many people make a full recovery. Abusing drugs and alcohol can also bring on psychosis.

Self-harm

Self-harm is when a person deliberately causes injury to their body. For many people self-harm is in response to serve emotional pain, that is often brought on by overwhelming negative feelings, thoughts or memories. Some individuals feel that they have no other way to express their emotions. Self-harm can take on many forms including some that are very dangerous for the individual. If you or someone you know is self-harming seek help immediately.

Helpful links for self-harm

Sane www.sane.org
Reach out www.reachout.com

Eating disorders

Eating disorders are considered a serious mental health disorder characterised by an unhealthy preoccupation with eating, exercise and body image. Eating disorders can also cause serious physical health issues. There are four eating disorders under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other specified eating disorders. Although it may be hard to recognise an eating disorder in its early stages, early intervention is the best way to ensure recovery.

Helpful links for eating disorders

The Butterfly Foundation (03) 9822 5771 www.thebutterflyfoundation.org.au
Eating Disorders Victoria 1300 550 236 www.eatingdisorders.org.au

How to get help for mental health issues?

  • talk to someone you trust, such as your parents, teacher, school counsellor, GP or religious leader
  • use online resources or call helplines. Most helplines are free
  • use the Mental Health Compass directory to help you find organisations in your area that can provide support
  • stay connected to friends and family.
  • eat healthy food, exercise regularly, and get regular sleep
  • connect with a youth mental health support organisation

**The use of drugs and alcohol can have a significantly negative affect on your mental health**

Helpful links for mental health support

For regional service near you, please use the Directory or Service Finder Navigational Tool on this website.

Kids Helpline 1800 55 1800 (free call)

Life Line 13 11 14 (free call)

Borderline Personality Disorder Community 0409 952 754 www.bpdcommunity.com.au

The Brotherhood of St Laurence (03) 9438 1183 www.bsl.org.au

Headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation 1800 367 968 www.headspace.org.au

Melbourne Youth Support 1800 800 531 Orygen Youth Health 1800 888 320 www.oyh.org.au

Mental Health Foundation of Australia (03) 9826 1422 - Helpline www.mhfa.org.au

Schizophrenia Fellowship of Australia (03) 9368 0600 www.schizophrenia.org.au

YMCA Victoria (03) 9403 5000 www.victoria.ymca.org.au

Youth Beyondblue www.youthbeyondblue.com

Youth Central www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au

Youth Support Advocacy Service YSAS (alcohol and drug support) www.ysas.org.au

Youth Positive Pathways http://youthpositivepathways.com.au/

The Salvation Army 13 72 58 www.salvos.org.au

Mental health and the use of drugs or alcohol

Illicit drugs, alcohol, nicotine and misuse of prescription drugs can not only be dangerous for your psychical health, but can have significant and severe effect on your mental health. They can cause you to act in ways that you would not normally act, and create unwanted feelings such as aggression, paranoia, lack of motivation, irritability. They can cause you to get in trouble with the law, are often factor in homelessness and can trigger a first episode of mental illness.

To learn more about various types of drugs go to:
Headspace http://headspace.org.au/get-info/category/alcohol-and-other-drugs

Helpful links for alcohol and other drugs

For regional services near you, please use the Directory or Service Finder Navigational Tool on this website.

Kids Helpline 1800 55 1800 (free call)
Headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation www.headspace.org.au
Youth Beyondblue www.youthbeyondblue.com

Child and Youth Mental Health Services CYMHS 1300 342 255 www.easternhealth.org.au
The Salvation Army 13 72 58 www.salvos.org.au
Family Drug Helpline 1300 660 068 www.shar.org.au
Self Help Addiction Resource Centre 9573 1700 www.vaada.org.au
Youth Support Advocacy Service YSAS (alcohol and drug support) www.ysas.org.au

Bullying

Bullying at school, online, at work and in the community can have devastating effects on the individual. Bullying can cause you to feel unsafe, hopeless, rejected, depressed, stressed, ashamed and even suicidal.

If someone is bullying you and you feel unsafe, afraid or suicidal seek help immediately. Go to someone you trust; a parent, a friend, a counsellor, your boss, your human resource officer, or call emergency services on 000.

What is bullying?

Bullying is when people intentionally and often repeatedly use words or actions against someone or a group of people to cause distress and risk to their physical or emotional wellbeing.

Bullying can take on many forms (these are some)

  • dominating or taking power over another by a person or group
  • physical or emotional harassment or abuse
  • cyber-bullying - this can take many forms and commonly occurs via social media
  • being purposely excluded
  • having rumours, or lies spread about you
  • people making you feel worthless or devalued
  • intentional being stalked
  • being harassed for your race, sex, sexual orientation, religion, or disability
  • making fun of you, such as rude name calling, or negative teasing especially in front of others
  • excluding you from workplace activities or withholding information especially if they are restricting you from doing your job effectively

Helpful links about bullying

Emergency services 000
Bullying Zero Australia 1800 028 559 www.bzaf.org.au
Lifeline 13 11 14
Kids helpline 1800 55 1800
Bullying No way www.bullyingnoway.gov.au
Reachout www.reachout.com

Are you caring for or living with someone suffering from mental illness or disability?

It is estimated there are over 388,000 young people in Australia helping to care for a person suffering from mental illness or other disabilities. This means that nearly 1 in 10 young people in Australia is a carer.

You are not alone.

Many young carers do not see themselves as a carer, they simply consider caring for a family member as doing their part. Caring for someone else's needs is a valuable role, but it is also important to get the support you need to ensure that your emotional, physical and mental health is maintained. It is also important to ensure that you have support so that you can continue to engage in your own life and meet the goals and milestones that are meaningful to you.

Helpful links for young carers

For regional services near you, please use the Directory or the Service Finder Navigational Tool on this website.

Copmi Children of Parents with a Mental Illness www.copmi.net.au
Youth Central www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au

Children’s mental health

Good childhood mental health means reaching developmental milestones and emotionally regulate according to age expectations. They learn healthy social skills and know how to cope when there are problems. Mentally healthy children have a positive quality of life and can function well at home, in school, and in their communities.

If you are concerned about your child talk to a GP, maternal health care nurse, a child psychologist, teacher or a paediatrician.

Helpful links for mental health support for children

Early Childhood Australia www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au

Early in Life Mental Health Service (ELMHS) 13 54 37 www.monashchildrenshospital.org/page/Kids_and_Teens/Specialist_Services/...

Kids Matter https://www.kidsmatter.edu.au/families/about-mental-health/should-i-be-c...

PEGS Parent Easy Guide www.parenting.sa.gov.au/pegs Raising Children Network www.raisingchildren.net.au

The Hunter Institute of Mental Health http://www.himh.org.au/

Zero to Three http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/early-childhood-mental-health/

Centre for Disease Control and Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/mentalhealth.html